Sunday, July 12, 2020 | ePaper

Bolivia's President resigns after losing army support

  • Print


AFP,  La Paz :
Bolivian president Evo Morales resigned Sunday, caving in following three weeks of sometimes-violent protests over his disputed re-election after the army and police withdrew their backing, sparking wild celebrations in La Paz.
"I resign my post as president," the leftist Morales said in a televised address, capping a day of fast-moving events in which many ministers and senior officials quit as support for Latin America's longest-serving president crumbled and creating a temporary leadership vacuum in the country.
The streets of La Paz immediately exploded in celebration, with jubilant Bolivians setting off firecrackers and waving the country's red, yellow and green flag.
The main opposition candidate in the election, former president Carlos Mesa, said Bolivians "have taught the world a lesson. Tomorrow Bolivia will be a new country." In the confusion, a group of 20 lawmakers and government officials took refuge at the Mexican ambassador's residence, and Mexico announced it was offering asylum to Morales as well.
Police announced on Sunday night that they had arrested Maria Eugenia Choque, the head of the country's electoral court, an institution slammed by the opposition as biased. Cuba and Venezuela, longtime allies of Morales, as well as Brazil's leftist leader Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva and Argentina's president-elect Alberto Fernandez, denounced a "coup."
Morales, a member of the Aymara indigenous community, is a former coca farmer who became Bolivia's first indigenous president in 2006.
He defended his legacy Sunday, which included landmark gains against hunger and poverty and tripling the country's economy during his nearly 14 years in office.
He gained a controversial fourth term when he was declared the winner of the 20 October presidential election by a narrow margin.
But the opposition said there was fraud in the vote count and three weeks of street protests ensued, during which three people died and hundreds were injured.
The Organization of American States carried out an audit of the election and on Sunday reported irregularities in just about every aspect that it examined: the technology used, the chain of custody of ballots, the integrity of the count, and statistical projections.
As chanting Bolivians kept up demonstrations in the street, the 60-year-old Morales called new elections, but this was not enough to calm the uproar. The commanders of the armed forces and the police joined the calls for the president's resignation.
Armed Forces chief Williams Kaliman told reporters he was asking Morales "to resign his presidential mandate to allow for pacification and the maintaining of stability, for the good of our Bolivia."
Power vacuum
Cracks had already appeared inside his own government, with the head of the lower house of parliament and the ministers of mines and hydrocarbons announcing their resignations.
Those were followed by a raft of other ministerial resignations after Morales' announcement and raised the question of who was in charge, given that vice president Alvaro Garcia Linera also resigned.
Under the constitution, power then passes to the president of the Senate and the speaker of the lower house of Congress in that order. But both of them have resigned as well.
Constitutional lawyer Williams Bascope, close to the opposition, said lawmakers "will have to convene immediately to elect their presidents."
A new Senate leader would thus be tasked with appointing a consensus cabinet and steering the country through to elections and a transition period.
'Political decision'
Morales lashed out against the OAS mission after its announcement, accusing it of making a "political decision" instead of a technical one.
"Some OAS technicians are at the service of... power groups."
To make the announcement that he was stepping down, Morales traveled by plane to the coca-growing Chimore region of central Bolivia, the cradle of his career in politics.
It was there in the 1980s that he made his name as a combative union leader defending farmers who grow coca, which in the Bolivian countryside is used for medicinal and other purposes. It is also the raw material for making cocaine.
Morales insisted he was not running away from his responsibilities.
"I do not have to escape. I have not stolen anything," he said.
"My sin is being indigenous. To be a coca grower."
"Life does not end here. The struggle continues," he said.
"I am resigning so that they (the opposition leaders) do not continue to kick our brothers," he said, referring to pro-government protesters who repeatedly clashed with opposition demonstrators.
With the situation in Bolivia unclear following the fast-moving events, regional heavyweight Colombia called for urgent meeting of the OAS permanent council "in order to look for solutions to a complex institutional situation" in Bolivia.
In the immediate aftermath of the shock announcement, Latin American leftist allies rallied to denounce a coup against one of their own.
Venezuela's president Nicolas Maduro called for a mobilization of political and social movements "to demand the preservation of the life of the Bolivian native peoples, victims of racism."
Cuba's foreign minister Bruno Rodriguez described Morales as "a protagonist and a symbol of the rights of the indigenous peoples of our Americas."
Brazil's Lula insisted "my friend Morales" had been removed in a coup, evidence of "an economic elite in Latin America that did not know how to share democracy with poor people."
Fernandez said a coup had been carried out "by the joint actions of violent civilians, police personnel who confined themselves to their barracks, and the passivity of the army."

More News For this Category

Regent Hospital, JKG group cheated us: DGHS

Staff Reporter :Directorate General of Health Services on Saturday claimed that it was cheated by Regent Hospital and JKG Group.Both the entities had been involved in gross irregularities including

 Dr Sabrina still `untouched`

Dr Sabrina still `untouched`

Syed Shemul Parvez :Though the misdeeds of JKG Healthcare came to light more than two weeks back, the law enforcement agencies are yet to take any action against its chairperson

India, Myanmar earn Tk 60,000 cr per year by cattle smuggling Traders demand halt in meat import

Staff Reporter :India and Myanmar earn around Tk 60,000 crore every year by cattle-smuggling to Bangladesh, said the country's meat traders on Saturday. Bangladesh Meat Traders Association (BMTA) and Dhaka

Hotels, motels, restaurants, tourist spots in Cox's Bazar will remain closed

Our correspondent :Residential hotels, motels, cottages, restaurants and tourist spots in Cox's Bazar, the country's main tourist destination, will remain closed before Eid-ul-Azha.Helaluddin Ahmed, senior secretary to the Local Government

DCCs to set up 27 cattle markets ahead of Eid

Staff Reporter :A total of 27 cattle markets, including two permanent ones, are expected to be set up by the two Dhaka city corporations in the capital ahead of Eid-ul-Azha,

30 die from corona, 2,686 infected in 24 hrs

Staff Reporter :Country on Saturday registered 30 deaths from coronavirus in the span of 24 hours, the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS) said it. "With the new deaths the

2.5 lakh Bangladeshis might be forced to leave

Noman Mosharef :Some 2.5 lakh Bangladeshi migrant workers might be forced to leave Kuwait after parliament approved expatriates quota Bill seeking to gradually slash the number of foreign workers in

362 among 500 reaching Italy in last two days are Bangladeshis

AFP :More than 500 migrants including 362 Bangladeshis have arrived on Lampedusa over the past two days, the UN's migration agency said on Friday, as people take advantage of calm

No gas in some areas of Dhaka on Sunday

Staff Reporter :Gas supply will be suspended for 12 hours in Banani, Mohakhali DOHS, Shaheed Tajuddin Ahmed Avenue, East Nakhalpara, and Dhaka Cantonment Residential area for the relocation and tie-in

UAE cancels visa extension for expatriates

Arab Times :The UAE Cabinet has revised its earlier regulations for residency visas of expatriates whose stay in the country was affected by the coronavirus pandemic, reports Arab Times.UAE residents,