Tuesday, November 12, 2019 | ePaper

Trump inadvertently reveals more of US-Mexico migrant deal

  • Print


US President Donald Trump holds piece of paper saying it's his deal with Mexico as he speaks with reporters at the White House.



US President Donald Trump revealed Tuesday that Mexico agreed to take stronger legal action to halt Central American migrants if its initial efforts to stem the flow don't show results in 45 days. In bright sunshine outside the White House, Trump waved what he said was the text of an agreement Mexican and US officials signed Friday to avert the application of tariffs on their exports to the United States. Photographs of the document revealed that Mexico appeared to pledge to enact or enforce certain domestic laws if Washington is not satisfied with the results of its first promised efforts-deploying 6,000 National Guardsmen to reinforce its southern border and expanding its policy of taking back asylum-seekers as the United States processes their claims.
If, after 45 days, the US government "determines at its discretion" that the results aren't enough, the document says, "the Government of Mexico will take all necessary steps under domestic law to bring the agreement into force."
The document gives the Mexican government another 45 days to achieve that.
It was not clear what specific measures the Mexican government would have to take.
Washington said last week it wanted Mexico to agree to a "safe third country" policy, in which migrants entering Mexican territory must apply for asylum there rather than the US.
Trump waved the ostensible agreement in front of reporters amid questions on whether his administration really did reach a substantial agreement last week to stem the flow of hundreds of thousands of migrants who pass through Mexico to enter the United States.
The initial deal appeared to repeat previous undertakings the Mexicans have made.
But Trump has repeatedly suggested there is another secret part of the deal that would require more of Mexico.
"Mexico is doing a great job at the border, really helping us," he said Tuesday.
"They have been working very hard. We're doing very well together. Good relationship."
Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard, who led Mexico's negotiating team on the deal, evaded reporters' questions on what exactly the Mexican government had agreed to in the event the US determines its progress is insufficient after 45 days.
"Mexico is not going to fail. Mexico is open to negotiations if we fail, but we're not going to fail," he told a news conference.
Pressed on what Mexico will do if Trump deems otherwise, he said, "I'm not going to reveal Mexico's strategy... That wouldn't be prudent."
Washington (AFP) - US President Donald Trump revealed Tuesday that Mexico agreed to take stronger legal action to halt Central American migrants if its initial efforts to stem the flow don't show results in 45 days.
In bright sunshine outside the White House, Trump waved what he said was the text of an agreement Mexican and US officials signed Friday to avert the application of tariffs on their exports to the United States.
Photographs of the document revealed that Mexico appeared to pledge to enact or enforce certain domestic laws if Washington is not satisfied with the results of its first promised efforts-deploying 6,000 National Guardsmen to reinforce its southern border and expanding its policy of taking back asylum-seekers as the United States processes their claims.
If, after 45 days, the US government "determines at its discretion" that the results aren't enough, the document says, "the Government of Mexico will take all necessary steps under domestic law to bring the agreement into force."
The document gives the Mexican government another 45 days to achieve that.
It was not clear what specific measures the Mexican government would have to take.
Washington said last week it wanted Mexico to agree to a "safe third country" policy, in which migrants entering Mexican territory must apply for asylum there rather than the US.
Trump waved the ostensible agreement in front of reporters amid questions on whether his administration really did reach a substantial agreement last week to stem the flow of hundreds of thousands of migrants who pass through Mexico to enter the United States.
The initial deal appeared to repeat previous undertakings the Mexicans have made.
But Trump has repeatedly suggested there is another secret part of the deal that would require more of Mexico.
"Mexico is doing a great job at the border, really helping us," he said Tuesday.
"They have been working very hard. We're doing very well together. Good relationship."
Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard, who led Mexico's negotiating team on the deal, evaded reporters' questions on what exactly the Mexican government had agreed to in the event the US determines its progress is insufficient after 45 days.
"Mexico is not going to fail. Mexico is open to negotiations if we fail, but we're not going to fail," he told a news conference.
Pressed on what Mexico will do if Trump deems otherwise, he said, "I'm not going to reveal Mexico's strategy... That wouldn't be prudent."

More News For this Category

Jordan retakes lands leased by Israel in 1994 peace accord

Jordan retakes lands leased by Israel in 1994 peace accord

AP, Amman :Jordan's King announced Sunday that his country is retaking "full sovereignty" over two pieces of land leased by Israel, reflecting the cool relations between the neighboring countries as

Divisions rife as Germany marks 30 years since Berlin Wall fell

Divisions rife as Germany marks 30 years since Berlin Wall fell

AFP, Berlin :Germany on Saturday marks 30 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall that ushered in the end of communism and national reunification, as the Western alliance that

Pompeo slams Iran 'intimidation' of IAEA inspector as 'outrageous'

Pompeo slams Iran 'intimidation' of IAEA inspector as 'outrageous'

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Friday slammed Tehran's treatment of an inspector with the UN's nuclear watchdog agency last week as "an outrageous and unwarranted act of intimidation."The

Iranian beauty queen wins asylum in Philippines

Iranian beauty queen wins asylum in Philippines

AFP, Manila :An Iranian beauty queen sought by Tehran on criminal charges has been granted political asylum in the Philippines, an official said Friday, ending a three-week standoff at Manila

Hundreds of Indian Sikhs begin historic crossing into Pakistan

Hundreds of Indian Sikhs begin historic crossing into Pakistan

AFP, Dera Baba Nanak :The first of hundreds of Indian Sikh pilgrims began a historic pilgrimage to Pakistan on Saturday, crossing through a white gate to reach one of their

UN experts call Morsi's death in Egypt 'arbitrary killing'

UN experts call Morsi's death in Egypt 'arbitrary killing'

AFP, Geneva :An independent panel of United Nations experts said Friday the death of former Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi in June could amount to "a state-sanctioned arbitrary killing"."Morsi was held

NASA unveils its first electric airplane - a work in progress

NASA unveils its first electric airplane - a work in progress

Reuters, California :NASA, most prominent for its many Florida-launched exploits into space, showcased an early version of its first all-electric experimental aircraft, the X-57 "Maxwell," on Friday at its lesser-known

News In Brief

Five Mexican police officers killed in ambushAFP, MexicoAt least five police officers were killed after they were ambushed in a small community nestled in the highlands of the state of

Ukraine foes to pull back troops ahead of Russia summit

Ukraine foes to pull back troops ahead of Russia summit

AFP, Ukraine :Ukraine's army and Kremlin-backed separatists are set Friday to complete the last phase of a troop pullback in the war-torn east in a key step towards a

Saudi King hosts CIA chief after spying on Twitter users charges

Saudi King hosts CIA chief after spying on Twitter users charges

AFP, Riyadh :Saudi Arabia's King Salman hosted the Central Intelligence Agency's director Thursday, state media said, after three people were charged in the United States with spying on Twitter