Sunday, April 21, 2019 | ePaper

'I am your mother now': NZ PM tells BD victims’ families

  • Print
Reuters,  Christchurch :
Husna Ahmed was 19 when she arrived in New Zealand from Bangladesh on her wedding day. Waiting to meet her was Farid, the man she would marry in a few hours, as their families had agreed.
A quarter of a century later, the life they had built together was torn apart at the Al Noor mosque in Christchurch when a gunman walked into the building, firing on worshippers at Friday prayers.
Husna encountered the gunman on his way out of the mosque. He shot her on the footpath. She fell and he fired two more shots, killing her instantly.
Farid, who uses a wheelchair after an earlier accident, was talking to a friend and was delayed    from joining worshippers at his usual spot at the front of the mosque, instead praying in a small side room.
He managed to escape when he heard the shooting begin, returning when the gunman left, to find many of his friends and community members dead and comfort those who were dying.
Farid found out about his wife's death when a detective he knew called his niece as they waited outside the mosque.
She passed the phone: "I don't want you to wait the whole night, Farid. Go home, she will not come," Farid said the detective told him.
"At the moment I hear that, my response was I felt numb," Farid told Reuters. "I had tears but I didn't break down." His niece crumbled.
A total of 50 people were killed in the rampage, with as many wounded, as the gunman went from Al Noor to another mosque in the South Island city.
Most victims were migrants or refugees from countries including Pakistan, India, Malaysia, Syria, Turkey, Somalia and Afghanistan.
Husna was one of five members of a growing but tight-knit Bangladeshi community killed, according to the Bangladesh consul in New Zealand, Shafiqur Rahman Bhuiyan. Four others were wounded, one critically, he added.
Members of the Bangladesh cricket team, in town for a test match against New Zealand, narrowly avoided the carnage, turning up at the Al Noor mosque soon after the attack took place.
Based on what eyewitnesses told him, Farid said instead of hiding, Husna helped women and children inside the mosque and ran to the front of the building to look for him.
"She's such a person who always put other people first and she was even not afraid to give her life saving other people," Farid said.
Australian Brenton Tarrant, 28, a suspected white supremacist, has been charged with murder. He entered no plea and police said he is likely to face more charges.
The slaughter has rocked Christchurch, and New Zealand, to its core, blanketing the city in grief and driving Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern to promise swift gun law reform.
Farid said he had forgiven his wife's killer.
"I want to give the message to the person who did this, or if he has any friends who also think like this: I still love you," Farid said. "I want to hug you and I want to tell him in face that I am talking from my heart. I have no grudge against you, I never hated you, I will never hate you."
A few hours after the massacre as evening fell, the front room of Farid's home in a sleepy Christchurch suburb where he runs a homeopathy business was full with survivors and friends grieving for a woman many described as like a mother to them.
Husna was born on 12 October in 1974 in Sylhet, a city on the banks the Surma River, in northeastern Bangladesh. She was so fast that Shahzalal Junior High School would only let her run three races, to give her rivals a chance, Farid said.
She moved to New Zealand in 1994.
Thin, nervous and overwhelmed by leaving everyone she knew for a new life in an alien country, she burst into tears when her husband-to-be picked her up from Auckland airport.
He comforted her on the long drive back to Nelson, where he was living, and where she quickly found her feet.
With almost no other Bangladeshis in the small city, Husna made English-speaking friends and learned the language within six months. Farid said she spoke it with more of a Kiwi accent than he did.
When Farid's workmates at a meatpacking plant agreed to work half an hour longer on Fridays so he could take a break to pray, she cooked them a feast every week in thanks.
And when Farid was partially paralyzed after being run over by a car outside his house, after four years of marriage, she moved with him to Christchurch and became his nurse.
"Our hobby was we used to talk to each other. A lot. And we never felt bored," he said.

More News For this Category

Nusrat's burning to death for sex is no insult to AL feminists

Editorial Desk :It is not a government of one person or no person when different departments of the government lapse into being nonfunctional. The government as a whole is

 Two more arrested

Two more arrested

Feni Correspondent :Police Bureau of Investigation (PBI) has arrested two more accused over the murder of Feni madrasa girl Nusrat Jahan Rafi.The arrestees are Emran Hossain Mamun and Iftekhar

BRI fits Bangladesh's priorities: Dr Gowher

UNB, Dhaka :Ahead of the second BRI Summit in Beijing, Prime Minister's International Affairs Adviser Gowher Rizvi on Saturday said Bangladesh welcomed China's Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) as

Burqa used by killer recovered

Burqa used by killer recovered

Staff Reporter :The Police Bureau of Investigation (PBI) on Saturday recovered a burqa used during the arson attack on Sonagazi madrasa student Nusrat Jahan Rafi from a ditch near

Patients on rise at icddr'b hospital due to scorching heat on Saturday.

Patients on rise at icddr'b hospital due to scorching heat on Saturday.

.

Another accused of Nusrat murder held from  Rangamati

Another accused of Nusrat murder held from Rangamati

bdnews24.com :Police have made another arrest over the murder of Feni madrasa student Nusrat Jahan Rafi, taking the number of arrestees in the case to 18.The latest arrestee, Iftekhar

India's top judge faces sexual harassment storm

India's top judge faces sexual harassment storm

AFP :India's top judge fought off a sexual harassment storm on Saturday after a former Supreme Court staff member accused him of making unwanted advances and hounding her.Chief justice

Our water 100pc drinkable: MD

Staff Reporter :Managing Director Taksim A Khan on Saturday claims that the water supplied by the Dhaka Water Supply and Sewerage Authority (WASA) in the capital is 100 per

Now needs clearance for high-rises

Staff Reporter :High-rise buildings need clearance for habitation. No one can live or establish commercial offices in any multistoried building without clearance.  Sources said, Cabinet Division on April 11

AL leader Ruhul Amin remanded

UNB, Feni :A court here on Saturday placed Sonagazi upazila unit Awami League President Ruhul Amin for a five-day remand over his involvement in madrasa girl Nusrat Jahan Rafi