Monday, June 17, 2019 | ePaper

'I am your mother now': NZ PM tells BD victims’ families

  • Print
Reuters,  Christchurch :
Husna Ahmed was 19 when she arrived in New Zealand from Bangladesh on her wedding day. Waiting to meet her was Farid, the man she would marry in a few hours, as their families had agreed.
A quarter of a century later, the life they had built together was torn apart at the Al Noor mosque in Christchurch when a gunman walked into the building, firing on worshippers at Friday prayers.
Husna encountered the gunman on his way out of the mosque. He shot her on the footpath. She fell and he fired two more shots, killing her instantly.
Farid, who uses a wheelchair after an earlier accident, was talking to a friend and was delayed    from joining worshippers at his usual spot at the front of the mosque, instead praying in a small side room.
He managed to escape when he heard the shooting begin, returning when the gunman left, to find many of his friends and community members dead and comfort those who were dying.
Farid found out about his wife's death when a detective he knew called his niece as they waited outside the mosque.
She passed the phone: "I don't want you to wait the whole night, Farid. Go home, she will not come," Farid said the detective told him.
"At the moment I hear that, my response was I felt numb," Farid told Reuters. "I had tears but I didn't break down." His niece crumbled.
A total of 50 people were killed in the rampage, with as many wounded, as the gunman went from Al Noor to another mosque in the South Island city.
Most victims were migrants or refugees from countries including Pakistan, India, Malaysia, Syria, Turkey, Somalia and Afghanistan.
Husna was one of five members of a growing but tight-knit Bangladeshi community killed, according to the Bangladesh consul in New Zealand, Shafiqur Rahman Bhuiyan. Four others were wounded, one critically, he added.
Members of the Bangladesh cricket team, in town for a test match against New Zealand, narrowly avoided the carnage, turning up at the Al Noor mosque soon after the attack took place.
Based on what eyewitnesses told him, Farid said instead of hiding, Husna helped women and children inside the mosque and ran to the front of the building to look for him.
"She's such a person who always put other people first and she was even not afraid to give her life saving other people," Farid said.
Australian Brenton Tarrant, 28, a suspected white supremacist, has been charged with murder. He entered no plea and police said he is likely to face more charges.
The slaughter has rocked Christchurch, and New Zealand, to its core, blanketing the city in grief and driving Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern to promise swift gun law reform.
Farid said he had forgiven his wife's killer.
"I want to give the message to the person who did this, or if he has any friends who also think like this: I still love you," Farid said. "I want to hug you and I want to tell him in face that I am talking from my heart. I have no grudge against you, I never hated you, I will never hate you."
A few hours after the massacre as evening fell, the front room of Farid's home in a sleepy Christchurch suburb where he runs a homeopathy business was full with survivors and friends grieving for a woman many described as like a mother to them.
Husna was born on 12 October in 1974 in Sylhet, a city on the banks the Surma River, in northeastern Bangladesh. She was so fast that Shahzalal Junior High School would only let her run three races, to give her rivals a chance, Farid said.
She moved to New Zealand in 1994.
Thin, nervous and overwhelmed by leaving everyone she knew for a new life in an alien country, she burst into tears when her husband-to-be picked her up from Auckland airport.
He comforted her on the long drive back to Nelson, where he was living, and where she quickly found her feet.
With almost no other Bangladeshis in the small city, Husna made English-speaking friends and learned the language within six months. Farid said she spoke it with more of a Kiwi accent than he did.
When Farid's workmates at a meatpacking plant agreed to work half an hour longer on Fridays so he could take a break to pray, she cooked them a feast every week in thanks.
And when Farid was partially paralyzed after being run over by a car outside his house, after four years of marriage, she moved with him to Christchurch and became his nurse.
"Our hobby was we used to talk to each other. A lot. And we never felt bored," he said.

More News For this Category

Cut on costly government and looters must be asked to return public money

The finance minister has prepared a fiscal plan to make Bangladesh a higher middle-income country by 2030. It speaks of essential reforms like overhaul of the tax machinery, cleaning

Supplementary budget to help bolster development: Lawmakers

Lawmakers participating in the supplementary budget discussion on Sunday said that the proposed supplementary budget for out-going 2018-19 fiscal would help bolster the ongoing development of the country.Taking part in

We joined to restore good governance, says Rumeen

Staff Reporter :The BNP lawmakers on Sunday said that they joined the parliament as their party is not getting space to hold democratic rights like holding processions and rallies outside.There

 Ex-OC Moazzem finally arrested

Ex-OC Moazzem finally arrested

Staff Reporter  :Moazzem Hossain, former Officer-in-Charge (OC) of Sonagazi Police Station was arrested from the city's Shahbagh, near the High Court  on Sunday afternoon  after 20 days of issuance of 

HC finds allegation of money exchange before food testing

Staff Reporter :The High Court (HC) on Sunday observed that there is an allegation of money exchange before testing of any food item."If we find any proof of anybody's involvement

India make 336/5, Pakistan 43/1

India make 336/5, Pakistan 43/1

Sports Reporter :India made 336 for the loss of five wickets in the stipulated 50 overs against Pakistan in their match of the ICC World Cup Cricket at Old Trafford

SC questions Is DIG Mizan more powerful than ACC?

Staff Reporter :The Appellate Division of the Supreme Court on Sunday asked the Anti-Corruption Commission (ACC) why Deputy Inspector General (DIG) of Police Mizanur Rahman is still not being arrested

Always stand beside people

Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina on Sunday directed members of the Bangladesh Army to always stand beside people by keeping competent and patriotic officers in its leadership."The army will have to

49 more killed as severe heat grips India's Bihar state

AFP :Severe heat has left dozens dead over a 24-hour period in India's Bihar state, as the country enters the third week of searing temperatures, officials said on Sunday.The deaths

Two teachers of VNSC get bail

Court Correspondent :Two teachers of Vikarunnisa Noon School and College yesterday secured bail in the case filed on the charge of a instigating student Aritri Adhikasri to commit suicide.Judge Rabiul