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Turkey says Interpol issued red notices over Khashoggi murder

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Turkish authorities requested red notices for 18 suspects in the murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi in November 2018.

AFP, Ankara, Turkey :
Turkey on Thursday said Interpol had issued red notices for 20 people in connection with the murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi.
Khashoggi, a Washington Post contributor and critic of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, was murdered at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on October 2 last year.
An Interpol red notice informs the police agency's member states about a suspected criminal wanted in one country.
Turkish authorities requested red notices for 18 suspects on November 15 and for two on December 21 in 2018, the justice ministry said.
Interpol issued the notices on March 1, the ministry said on Twitter, without giving further details on the suspects.
Turkey has said the journalist was killed by a team of 15 Saudis who strangled him. His remains have yet to be found.
Eleven men are on trial in Saudi Arabia, accused of involvement in the killing. The attorney-general is seeking the death penalty for five of them.
Turkish authorities requested red notices for 18 suspects on November 15 and for two on December 21 in 2018, the justice ministry said.
Interpol issued the notices on March 1, the ministry said on Twitter, without giving further details on the suspects.
Turkey has said the journalist was killed by a team of 15 Saudis who strangled him. His remains have yet to be found.
Eleven men are on trial in Saudi Arabia, accused of involvement in the killing. The attorney-general is seeking the death penalty for five of them.
Meanwhile, the State Department labeled Jamal Khashoggi's murder a human rights violation committed by Saudi Arabian government agents in a report released Wednesday.
The report, which details human rights abuses around the world, makes no mention of whether Saudi Arabia's crown prince, Mohamed bin Salman, played a role in The Washington Post columnist's death.
The State Department's top human rights official declined to say what role, if any, the CIA's assessment of the case played in the account of Khashoggi's death. The CIA concluded that the crown prince directed Khashoggi's murder, according to multiple lawmakers briefed by the agency's director, Gina Haspel.
"When we do these reports, we seek all relevant sources of information, including U.S. intelligence information," Ambassador Michael Kozak, who leads the State Department's Democracy, Human Rights and Labor Bureau, said Wednesday in a briefing on the annual report, which is required by Congress. Kozak said he would not discuss what intelligence information he and other officials reviewed with respect to Saudi Arabia or any other country.
In its account of Khashoggi's death, the State Department report says Saudi government agents "carried out the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi inside the consulate of Saudi Arabia in Istanbul, Turkey, on October 2." Khashoggi was a fierce critic of the crown prince, who is the country's de facto ruler.
Saudi Arabia's King Salman "pledged to hold all individuals involved accountable, regardless of position or rank" and 11 suspects have been indicted by the kingdom's public prosecutor's office, the human rights report notes. The Saudi government has not publicly named any of those 11 suspects or provided any detailed account of where its investigation stands.
"In other cases, the government did not punish officials accused of committing human rights abuses, contributing to an environment of impunity," the report says.
Kozak defended the omission of the crown prince's name in connection with Khashoggi.
"We can all have our suspicions or speculations, but our effort is fact-driven rather than opinion-driven," he said. He repeated the Saudi government's assertions that it is still investigating Khashoggi's death.
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo singled out four countries - Iran, South Sudan, Nicaragua and China - in brief remarks on the report, which examines the human rights records of more than 200 countries and territories.
China "is in a league of its own when it comes to human rights violations," Pompeo said. He pointed to the Chinese government's repressive campaign against Muslim minority groups.

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