Friday, November 16, 2018 | ePaper

An extraordinary initiative for educating students who come from poor families

  • Print
CHILDREN at Sirajganj's Kagmari Char are now free from the hassle of making risky journeys to school on boats. They thank O Aa Ka Kha School, the brainchild of Sirajganj resident Dr Nazmul Islam, for that. The school not only saves the little learners' time but also provides them with education materials at a monthly fee of only Tk 10.
It all started in 2016 when Nazmul, a medical graduate, received a blow in his persuasion of MBBS after he failed in a course on surgery. But instead of lamenting over it, Nazmul made the best possible use of his time by setting up the school in Savar on the outskirts of Dhaka.
In January this year, he extended his vision and established another branch for the children at Kagmari Char, which is about 10 kilometres off his home town. Twenty of his friends, who were studying at the same medical school in Savar, supported him in his mission.90 children were attending classes from grades one to five and most of the teachers were University students. Classes are held six days a week and the students take part in different extra-curricular activities as well.
Setting up such schools is a noteworthy initiative by our general citizens. They are helping children who reside in remote areas to continue their education at a cost which is affordable to the vast majority of our citizens. Such schools represent a beacon of light for those students who, either due to distance or impecunious means, are unable to continue their education after a certain point in their school going years.
It's appreciating that such initiatives are helping the low income students to attain a proper education. Increasing literacy rates is a major factor in boosting our nation's economic growth and development. Education is the single most important factor when it comes to increasing the efficiency of our labour force. Ensuring a strong and well educated workforce is a goal which will reap huge dividends for our nation in the future.

More News For this Category

Mass awareness needed if NBR wants more people under tax net

THE countrywide 'Income Tax Fair -2018' has already drawn a huge crowd. The authorities hope more people would be brought under tax net this year too. Finance Minister AMA

Migrant workers : Unsung heroes deserve more attention

MIGRANT rights activists from the South Asian countries on Wednesday called for taking up strong labour migration programmes to promote and protect decent works for migrants. They put forth

Readers’ Forum

Alarming rise in Dhaka's population Dhaka has recently been branded as the second worst city in the world to live in by the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU). The ranking

Healthy rivers and lakes are essential for existence

Andreas Baumüller :Healthy rivers, lakes and wetlands are not a luxury. They are essential to our existence. They supply and purify our  drinking water. They help us adapt to

Trump's anti-media rhetoric

Thalif Deen :A former French president once remarked: Never pick a fight with a little kid or the press. The kid will throw the last stone at you and

Community engagement needed to reduce disaster risks

Lisa Cornish :Over the past decade, almost 4000 natural disasters have impacted 2 billion people costing $1.7 billion in damages. Two-thirds of those affected were found in China, India,

Time for fixing banking irregularities

THE Bangladesh Bank's role as the custodian of the production and distribution of money and credit in the economy has been eroded by the finance ministry in the past

Power vacuum in Sri Lanka as political crisis deepens

THE ongoing political crisis in the South Asian island nation Sri Lanka has depended further as its Parliament yesterday passed a no-confidence motion against newly appointed Prime Minister Mahinda

Shifting from manager to leader

Sara Canaday :Just because you have a management title doesn't automatically mean you're a great leader. But making that sometimes-subtle shift is essential for the success of your career

The echoes of November 1918

Daniel W. Drezner :For the past five years, centennials marking the First World War have haunted international relations pundits. A few years ago, to mark the start of the