Tuesday, May 21, 2019 | ePaper

Genes control heart's response to exercise

  • Print


Life Desk :
Whether your heart beats faster or how your blood pressure responds while exercising all depends on your genes. The way a person's heart reacts to exercise can also foretell any heart or blood vessel problems in the future, according to new research conducted by the University of Guelph (Canada) and published in The Journal of Physiology.
Exercise usually causes an increase in heart rate and blood pressure, a common phenomenon, but the magnitude varies for different people. Earlier studies have shown that people whoencounter abnormal increase in blood pressure levels during exercise will experience high blood pressure in the future.
'Genetic mutations in receptor molecules of skeletal muscle cells influence the way the person's heart rate and blood pressure respond to exercise.'
Thus, understanding why people react differently to exercise is essential to identify risk factors and conduct early monitoring or treatment for those individuals at risk.
The research measured the heart rate and blood pressure of 200 healthy young men and women before and during a handgrip exercise and analyzed their DNA for genetic risk factors. The results showed that the difference in responses might be caused by the genetic variations in receptors found in skeletal muscles. Receptors are protein molecules present on cell surfaces that bind to a drug or a hormone and initiate a change within the cell.
Scientists identified two common genetic mutations in skeletal muscle receptors that were responsible for higher blood pressure during exercise when compared to people who did not have them. The difference was more pronounced in men.
The limitations of the study included a small sample size and the use of only one specific type of exercise. However, the effect of these genetic variants in the skeletal muscle receptors was significant.
Further work will be needed to look at other types of exercise and to replicate this finding.
Philip J. Millar, the corresponding author of the study, commented on the findings of the results 'This research suggests the presence of these receptors can contribute to larger blood pressure responses during exercise - a risk factor for future problems with the heart or blood vessels. It is important to examine why we saw this difference mainly in men, and to understand the specific mechanisms behind how these genetic variants influence their heart rate and blood pressure responses to exercise.'
Source-Medindia

More News For this Category

Integrity matters if you want to create positive change Zoe Weil

Integrity matters if you want to create positive change Zoe Weil

Mahatma Gandhi was once asked by a reporter, "What is your message to the world?"Gandhi responded by jotting down on a piece of paper: "My life is my message."When I

High insulin costs come under fire

Health Desk :For many Americans, the cost of lifesaving insulin is simply too high, leading as many as one in four to ration the drug, experts testifying before the House

Diabetes during pregnancy increase depression risk

Life Desk :Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) may increase the risk of developing postpartum depression symptoms and type 2 diabetes later in life, reports a new study. The findings of

ESDO working for developing health, sanitation of slum dwellers

ESDO working for developing health, sanitation of slum dwellers

Life Desk  :Eco-Social Development Organisation (ESDO) is working for development of the health and sanitation of the slum dwellers in the city. ESDO believes that health and development are

Is carbonated water bad for your health?

Life Desk :Are you someone who prefers to have sparkling water on a daily basis rather than natural water? Well, there's some bad news for you. Carbonated drinks are

How to be a happier parent

How to be a happier parent

Lydia Denworth  :Now that the kids have gone back to school, what do mornings look like in your house? Was everyone organized and on the ball on day one-clothes

Evolution of the primate brain

Samantha Jones, PhD :What events led to differences between humans and other primates? What changes throughout evolution underlie such a dramatic shift in how we socialize and process information?Although

A word to the wise

A word to the wise

Lawrence R. Samuel, PhD :People who feel they are making strides up their personal evolution ladder are often not just healthy and happy but wise, or at least in

Texting can enhance romance in relationship

Texting can enhance romance in relationship

Wendy L. Patrick, Ph.D :"As soon as their eyes locked from across the crowded room, it was love at first sight." How old fashioned, right? Who meets in person

Maintaining active brain and body even with cancer

Maintaining active brain and body even with cancer

Arthur P. Shimamura, PhD :In 2015, I retired after an enjoyable and rewarding career as a member of the faculty in the Department of Psychology at UC Berkeley. My goal