Tuesday, October 16, 2018 | ePaper

Establishing rights of climate displaced persons

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Dr. Md. Shairul Mashreque and Dr. M Abul Kashem Mozumder :
The 'Peninsula Principles provide a comprehensive normative framework,based on principles of international law, human rights obligations and goodpractice, within which the rights of climate displaced persons can beaddressed within a State and not cross-border climate displacement. These principles set out protection and assistance principles, consistent with theUN Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement, to be applied to climatedisplaced persons'.  Peninsula Principles consisted of 18 sub titles as follows
l Principle-1: Scope and Purpose
l Principle-2: Definitions
l Principle-3: Non-discrimination, Rights and Freedoms
l Principle-4: Interpretation
l Principle-5: Prevention and Avoidance
l Principle-6: Provision of Adaptation Assistance, Protection and Other
Measures
l Principle-7: National Implementation Measures
l Principle-8: International Cooperation and Assistance
l Principle-9: Climate Displacement Risk Management
l Principle-10: Participation and Consent
l Principle-11: Land Identification, Habitability and Use
Social Change (ISSN: 1997-938X) Volume 4, No 1 & 2, 2014
l Principle-12: Loss and Damage in the Context of Displacement
l Principle-13: Institutional Frameworks to Support and Facilitate the
Provision of Assistance and Protection
l Principle-14: State Assistance to those Climate Displaced Persons
Experiencing Displacement but who have not been Relocated
l Principle-15: Housing and Livelihood
l Principle-16: Remedies and Compensation
l Principle-17: Framework for Return
l Principle-18: Implementation and Sissemination
We have a plenty of climate displacement reports from Project papers, studies, research notes and discussion papers. Documents on climate displacement can be found on web. Site They include among others: documents from the International Alliance of Research Universities' March, 2009 conference in Copenhagen, Climate Change: Global Risks, Challenges and Decisions; a seminar presentation made at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at the London School of Economics and Political Science; and other seminar and conference presentations and document prepared by YPSA.
Displacement Solutions published a ground-breaking report on "climate displacement in Bangladesh. This 36-page report comprehensively examines the scope and causes of climate displacement across Bangladesh. Drawing on extensive fieldwork, the report highlights that climate displacement is not just a phenomenon to be addressed at some point in the future, it is a crisis that is unfolding across Bangladesh now. Sea-level rise and tropical cyclones in coastal areas, as well as flooding and riverbank erosion in mainland areas, are already resulting in the loss of homes, land and property and leading to mass displacement. Further, all of the natural hazards that are causing displacement are expected to increase in both frequency and intensity as a result of climate change - almost inevitably leading to the displacement of many millions more across Bangladesh. This report comprehensively examines current and future causes of climate displacement in Bangladesh. The report also examines existing and proposed Government and civil society policies and programmes intended to provide solutions to climate displacement. The report highlights a number of protection gaps in the response of both the Government of Bangladesh and the international community to the plight of climate displaced persons. The report emphasizes that rights-based solutions, in particular, housing, land and property rights solutions must be utilised as the basis for solving this crisis. The report concludes by proposing a number of concrete recommendations that could be utilized to provide solutions to climate displacement."
The situation in Bangladesh reveals that the problem of climate displacement is a present. one signaling future uncertainties. The government of Bangladesh and that of other poor countries have been urged upon to take heed of the climate displacement nightmare unfolding to add to humanitarian crisis.
All national governments have been directed to make best use of the funds that may be placed at their disposals. Local bureaucracies and other implementing agencies must be sensitized to make best use of the fund keeping an arm's length from fuzzy governance.  
The effects of climate change may cause large-scale human displacement.. The global project intervention t must address the problem of climate change displacement. The focus of th global project intervention is contained in a proposal for a convention for climate change displaced persons (CCDPs). The convention would establish an international regime for the provision of pre-emptive, adaptive assistance to those likely to be displaced by the devastation caused by climate change.
The green climate fund is intended to help climate vulnerable countries to fight out global warming. Launched at a UN climate conference at Durban, in December 2011 the green fund is to 'channel up Dollar 100 billion a year by 2020 in aid of poor, vulnerable countries to adapt to climate change and cut emissions.
Earmarking funds from the recently agreed green climate fund(GCF) of the Durban climate meet (2011) has happened to be 'one concrete means by which the international community could ensure that the displaced people in Bangladesh receives their fair share of the funds required to deal with the consequence of climate change'
The United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP-17), Durban 2011, has brought together representatives of the world's governments, international organizations and civil society. The conference   seeks to advance, in a balanced fashion, the implementation of the Convention and the Kyoto Protocol, as well as the Bali Action Plan agreed at COP 13 in 2007, and the reached at COP 16.
The Chief US negotiator Todd Stern said: 'Obviously the package is not going to solve climate change by itself, but I think it is a big step forward.' 'In a key area, the agreement set up a 'Green Climate Fund' to administer assistance to poor nations, which many experts say are already suffering more floods and drought as temperatures steadily mount'. 'The green climate fund is intended to raise and disburse dollar 100 a year by 2020 to protect poor nations against climate impacts and assist them with low carbon development.'
Worst victims in Bangladesh are expected to get formal support from major players in the climate negotiations Bangladesh, which tops a Global Climate Risk Index published during the Copenhagen talks, strongly backs an extension of the Kyoto Protocol, as the only existing binding instrument on emission cuts, rather than creation of an entirely new climate deal.
Bangladesh is also urging rich nations to contribute at least US$100 billion for a global fund to help poor nations adapt to climate change. Britain, meanwhile, is the first country to contribute 75 million pounds for creation of Bangladesh's own multi-donor trust fund for climate change adaptation.
The small island states have threatened to boycott the conference. These states including African union have been organized into three alliances each expressing common views about limiting temperature to not more than one degree Celsius. They demanded compensation package for the victims. Human rights activists in various countries demanded climate justice and fair deal, heavy compensation package even immigration of the climate displaced people from poor and vulnerable countries.
The situation in Bangladesh reveals that the problem of climate displacement is a present one signaling future uncertainties. The government of Bangladesh and that of other poor countries have been urged upon to take heed of the climate displacement nightmare unfolding to add to humanitarian crisis.
Bangladesh is a country badly affected by natural calamities caused by climate change. Flood is an annual affair. Tornado with tidal surge wreck havoc in coastal areas rendering much shelter less. The islanders have had nightmarish experiences about Aila and Sidre and mahasen that recently hit South and Eastern Bangladesh.
The situation in Bangladesh reveals that the problem of climate displacement is a present one signaling future uncertainties. The government of Bangladesh and that of other poor countries have been urged upon to take heed of the climate displacement nightmare unfolding to add to humanitarian crisis.
All national governments have been directed to make best use of the funds that may be placed at their disposals. Local bureaucracies as implementing agencies must be sensitized to make best use of the fund keeping an arm's length from fuzzy governance.

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