Sunday, August 19, 2018 | ePaper

Revitalizing education in line of job, research and knowledge

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Dr. Forqan Uddin Ahmed :
Education is a basic need for mankind as all as human resource development. In the present world, there is an ample scope for education. There are different branches and components in the educational arena. They are general education, scientific education and technical education and so on. Every branch or subject is equally important for the development of mankind.
In our country education is not in an optimum standard or position. From primary level to higher education minimum standard is not maintained here. In the 80% institutions, the teachers and students do not have their endeavor to reach the desired goal. Nobody is found serious in their respective profession to attain their knowledge and develop skill. The teachers only think how to increase the rate of pass percentage by fair means or foul. Standard is not a factor to them. They do not even think of obtaining distinction marks, extra ordinary result or some sorts of brilliant success.
Both the students and teachers are being satisfied with an average result only. If somehow a degree is obtained, a student gets a social position. By the capacity of so called degree, ours students are being employed in the nation building activities. Having no knowledge, our students are obtaining the degree and getting the opportunity of better employment in the field of teaching, management, administration, business and in the national and multinational financial sectors. Consequently advancement is hindered and development becomes a handicap to nation. In the educational institution on adequate number of teachers remain busy with tuition business and coaching based activities. They do not attend classes in time and they are not serious about the job what they are supposed to perform. Moreover performance evaluation is not made from students or authority's corner. The teachers do not make any lesson plan, progress report or any checklist of scheduled works. They do not guide the students properly and pay any attention for the improvement of their learning.
For improving skills and bright job market, emphasize has to be given to Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET). Since TVET students come from underprivileged background it helps to alleviate poverty as well. TVET institutions can respond to the training need different than that of the traditional and targets the youth, poor and vulnerable of the society.  Being work-oriented, it focuses on training employable skills and can help to raise the skilled and entrepreneurial workforce that Bangladesh needs to get out of poverty. All over South Asia there is a renewed emphasis on the role of TVET in national development among policy-makers and the international donor community. China, Laos, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam have formed regional Cooperation Platform (RCP) for vocational teacher training and international knowledge exchange among TVET research, industry and providers.
 All institutions of these countries will follow similar curriculum and a standardized qualification framework to facilitate labor mobility. There are still a lot of challenges; students should be placed in job by the institutions through developing linkage with the employers. UCEP provides job to more than 95 % of their graduates.
The most demanded skills abroad have to be identified and included in the trades to be trained; linkage should be maintained with international agencies for exchanging technical knowledge. Syllabuses should be updated reflecting the market demand; training facilities should be established for teachers. Providing TVET requires more funds than general education; the government has to consider it as a long term investment. The payment issue of VET graduates is a long neglected issue; this has to be addressed. And above all the community still considers TVET as second tier education; this perception has to be changed.
As it stands, poor educational outcomes and inefficient education systems are eliciting deep concern worldwide. In many countries, primary schools fail to provide students with appropriate cognitive skills like numeracy, literacy, problem-solving ability, and general scientific knowledge. Furthermore, inadequate education at the secondary and tertiary levels, including technical and vocational education and training, is leaving students unequipped to meet the job market's changing demands. As a result, many countries are struggling with a mismatch between the skills that employers seek and those that workers have. Though academic performance is determined largely by family inputs and students' individual talents, other factors, such as the amount of school resources available to students, also play an important role, as do various other school inputs, such as teacher quality, class size, expenditure per pupil, and instruction time.
The institutional features of education systems are another important determinant of student achievement. Private financing and provision, school autonomy, and external monitoring and assessment mechanisms tend to influence the quality of education by changing the incentives for students and teachers. In the future, new information and communication technologies are expected to stimulate the expansion of educational opportunities and to improve educational quality at the national and global level, by offering a variety of innovative learning channels.
 For example, the ability to use new technologies to build borderless networks among schools can offer opportunities for students in low-income countries to learn from teachers in advanced countries - and vice versa.
The imperative is clear. Global leaders must commit to enhancing the quality of education and reduce the education gap by increasing school resources, improving the efficiency of educational institutions, and sizing the opportunities afforded by technological innovation. All of this will serve to enrich human capital, which is essential to boosting productivity and incomes. Knowledge is socially constructed and, in fact, all of our learning is reconstructed on our past experiences. When we learn anything the new knowledge is amassed in our memory store. Development of knowledge depends on the quantity and quality of social interactions where surroundings and socio-economic status of the interacting partners influence the construction and reconstructions of knowledge.
Civilization and culture are inter-related with the condition of job market, knowledge and research. Actually civilization and culture develop through education. So education must be revitalised and prioritised to human resource development so that our youths are employed and build their future career. More over knowledge and research based society will develop.

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