Monday, November 19, 2018 | ePaper

Brexit issue : UK faces leadership crisis

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BRITISH Prime Minister Theresa May's government appears to be in deep trouble over the Brexit issue. First it was the Brexit minister David Davis to have resigned over her master plan for Britain's future outside the EU and just day before yesterday it was the British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson to have followed suit. Davis and his deputy reportedly quit overnight over May's plan to retain strong economic ties with the European Union even after Britain is expected to leave in March next year.
The point, however, UK is passing through a critical stage in its history. And the presence of an apt leader is evidently missing to take the country forward through this thorny path.  All eyes are now on the next move by Brexit hardliners in her centre-right Conservative Party. But the appointment of Dominic Raab, a leading Brexit supporter is clearly hinting that Conservative Party's Brexiteers have become divided.
However, Theresa May's plan for leaving the European Union is a rare moment of victory for commonsense in the madness of Brexit. That said - the good news is that the terms and conditions of exit are softer than she has previously claimed it would be. The bad news is that it is still an exit from the EU.
Analysts said the main reason why the Brexit debate has gone round in circles-and why the U.K.'s negotiations with the EU have been almost completely stalled for months-is that much of the British political class have never fully understood what the EU is or how it works. The few who have evidently consider the implications so unpalatable that they dare not spell them out publicly.
Now, the British PM has sensibly realised that her red lines, drawn up to please the hardliners in her party, would have been a disaster for British business and jobs - a type of well-timed realisation most of the time missing among our political leaders.
Now it's up to the UK government to minimize the degree of economic, domestic and diplomatic repercussions looming at large over the country. We believe the UK leaders know it and would attempt the best for overcoming it.

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