Sunday, February 17, 2019 | ePaper

World Vitiligo Day

  • Print


Life Desk  :
World Vitiligo Day is observed globally on the 25th June, pop singer Michael Jackson's death anniversary to raise awareness about this ignored skin disease. Vitiligo patients are subject to severe social stigma and sufferers also undergo psychological and emotional trauma as a result. Vitiligo is characterized by loss of normal skin color and light colored patches (more evident on darker skin) that progress over time. An estimated 100 million people suffer from this disease globally.
History of World Vitiligo Day
World Vitiligo Day was founded and first observed in 2011 by Ogo Maduewesi, founder of VITSAF (Vitiligo Support and Awareness Foundation) in Nigeria, and Yan Valle, CEO of the Vitiligo Research Foundation. The day was created to raise awareness and educate the general public about vitiligo, to educate health care personnel about care and treatment, as well as raise money for research and possible cure for the condition.
Since its establishment, the day is celebrated globally, raising awareness of the bullying, social stigma, disability and psychological trauma of the hundreds of persons worldwide who suffer from vitiligo.
'Vitiligo should be seriously researched with aim for a cure and should be made a part of national healthcare programs'
World Vitiligo Day is also referred to as "Vitiligo Awareness Day" or "Vitiligo Purple Fun day", which is the color chosen as Vitiligo Awareness Color. June25th was chosen to mark World Vitiligo Day as a tribute to pop singer Michael Jackson, who died on the 25th June 2009 and suffered from vitiligo.
Aims of World Vitiligo Day 2018
This year the campaign hopes to collect a million signatures addressed to the United Nations in order to
Afford recognition to this painfully ignored and debilitating disease with serious social and emotional complications
Urgent need to proceed with multipronged efforts aimed at newer and effective treatments and health-care education
Designate 25th June as the World Vitiligo Day to be celebrated by the United Nations and its Member States annually
Integrate vitiligo into national health care systems
Raise awareness about the condition on a global platform
Collect statistics from countries worldwide on prevalence of vitiligo
In fact the campaign this year hopes to gain global attention by highlighting youth affected by the condition and communicate hope for the future generation about the concerted efforts of the World Vitiligo Day.
The organizers believe that recognition of the disease would be the first step for more sustained efforts to be taken in order to achieve the desired results and much needed social change.
Ways in which public and health personnel can raise awareness
There are several ways we can do our bit to raise awareness about vitiligo
Share widely on social media such as Facebook and Twitter inspiring and educational messages using the hashtag #WorldVitiligoDay
Organize events within the community and speak on this condition and distribute information leaflets
Raising funds for research through sales of purple themed T-shirts, bracelets or other trinkets carrying catchy and educative messages
Get prominent personalities suffering vitiligo to speak about their journey and inspire countless sufferers to overcome this condition
Skin specialists and clinics can offer free check-ups and discounts for vitiligo patients on this day
Broadcasting programs on visual media with talks and discussions by doctors and experts; write-ups in the print media about this condition
Involve local administration to offer support for the campaign and make healthcare accessible to the poor and needy vitiligo patients
We can make personal contributions to the World Vitiligo Day campaign and show our solidarity
What is Vitiligo?
Vitiligo is a skin disease that occurs when pigment-producing cells (melanocytes) in skin die or lose their function.
As a result the normal skin color is lost and the person develops pale, depigmented skin patches that can affect any part of the body, including the mouth, hair and eyes.
It is more noticeable in people with darker skin.
The condition is progressive. Treatments are available that may improve the appearance of the skin but presently there is no cure and it is a chronic lifelong condition and sufferers are often socially stigmatized.

Source-Medindia

More News For this Category

Mental disorders account for 13pc global burden of disease

Mental disorders account for 13pc global burden of disease

Life Report :Mental health constitutes a major public health challenge undermining the social and economic development throughout much of the developing world like Bangladesh, opined Prof Dr Md Harunur

Self-control may determine future earning

Life Desk :If you have self-control over the desire to get instant benefits, then you are more likely to earn higher income later, finds a study. In the study,

Spot toxic 'friends' in facebook

Wendy L. Patrick, PhD :We make friends quickly on social media; which is ironic, given the absence of the visual, verbal, and behavioral cues that we use every day

Can hunger make us more forgiving?

Can hunger make us more forgiving?

Rob Henderson :Many of us notice that we act differently when we're hungry. You might get more easily irritated or find it more challenging to focus. A new study

Parenting an adult addict can be a battle of wills

Parenting an adult addict can be a battle of wills

Suzanne Degges-White Ph.D. The strength of an addiction's hold on your child is a predictor of the magnitude of the fight you will face. When you first realize that

The big, the beautiful, and the healthy?

The big, the beautiful, and the healthy?

Cosmopolitan UK recently announced that Tess Holliday would be gracing the cover of their October 2018 issue. This announcement was met with controversy. Why? Well, Holliday is a plus-sized model.

Unlock your linguistic creativity

Unlock your linguistic creativity

Moses Ma :A sign of deep creativity is the ability to create new words on the fly. Consider William Shakespeare… he invented over 2000 words! He made up words

Stop complaining

Stop complaining

Robert Taibbi L.C.S.W.We all complain at times. Kids complain about their friends who didn't talk to them at lunch, the teacher who was mean, the little brother who is

Beware the savior mentality

Mesmin Destin Ph.D. Many of us have sat uncomfortably through cringe-worthy portrayals of "well-intended" people trying to use their position and resources to improve the lives of others. Some

Getting a bonus at work

Getting a bonus at work

Marylène Gagné Ph.D. Did you get up on this (hopefully) beautiful Monday morning thinking about the money you will make this week? While some go to a job they