Wednesday, December 19, 2018 | ePaper

Rohingya rehabilitation to affect allocation of priority sectors

  • Print

EXPERTS have expressed apprehension that the Annual Development Budget for priority works such as health and education facilities would likely to be diverted for the rehabilitation of Rohingya refugees, as per news media. For that reason, allocations of many priority sectors, including the inclusion of 1,000 schools in the monthly payment order (MPO) system requiring Tk 4,000 crore, would be largely affected. The annual allocations to the Education and Technology Sector and the Health Sector remained static at around 16 per cent and five per cent respectively for many years due to fund crunch.  According to newspaper reports, Tk 2,312 crore will be needed to rehabilitate 103,200 Rohingyas in Bhashan Char's 120 cluster villages.
The government has already requested the World Bank to provide $400 million as grant for Rohingya rehabilitation, although, as per CPD, $882 million would be needed for Rohingya rehabilitation in the first 10 months, ending in June. It is anticipated that empathy towards the Rohingyas has decreased in absence of the aid inflows. Experts have already cautioned that international organizations' aid support to Rohingya refugees might not continue for long and the Bangladesh government would have to shoulder their full burden. The refugee burden will ultimately bring pressure on the country's job market. It would reduce workers' daily wages and increase the cost of living in the coming days in the Chattogram region unless they are repatriated quickly.
We know over 7 lakh Rohingyas were forcibly driven into Bangladesh by Myanmar's Security Forces since August 25 last year. They have taken shelter in many makeshift tents on hills and roadsides in Cox's Bazar district. About 6,000-acres of forest have been destroyed for making temporary shelters for them which means loss of timber worth Tk 1,000 crore. Continuing land degradation, soil erosion, extraction of underground water and waste management would add to the government's burden so long they stay in Bangladesh.
Undoubtedly, the Rohingyas have put huge pressure on our economy and society. We can't ignore the most persecuted people of the world but at the same time the world should extend their humanitarian cooperation in this regard. We think that the Bangladesh government must energise the Foreign Ministry to ensure sufficient international aid for the Rohingya people until and unless they are repatriated to their homeland as Myanmar citizens with dignity.

More News For this Category

Comprehensive policy needed for migrant workers' safeguard

BANGLADESH on Tuesday observed International Migrants Day when the country itself is experiencing bitter taste of slow remittance due to drastic fall in overseas job opportunities for workers and increasing

The administration must prove its ability to hold free and fair polls

NEW United States ambassador in Dhaka Robert Earl Miller said that his country expected the upcoming December 30 elections in Bangladesh to be free, fair and credible as he paid

A new path for disability-inclusive development

Helen Castell :While 15 percent of the world's population lives with a disability, prevalence is even higher in low- and middle-income countries. Here, people with disabilities face the same challenges

Sri Lanka: No alternative but to hear the people's voice

Rajpal Abeynayake :If the people's voice is not heard, the country would be rife for revolution. It would be a real one, not of the ersatz variety that celebrates a

Readers’ Forum

Young voice in politicsPolitics remains more or less an unpopular vocation and an extremely debatable topic in our country-more so for many young people who seem generally disinclined to have

Dried-fish sector needs govt support to expand export

THE dried-fish industry in southeastern district of Cox's Bazar and some other parts of the country is now thriving. Bangladesh earns foreign currency by exporting dried-fish to different countries, including

Dhaka must involve ASEAN nations for early Rohingya repatriation

MALAYSIAN Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad on Sunday asked the ASEAN nations to take tough measures for creating pressure on Myanmar and its de facto leader Aung San Suu Kyi to

Climate change is a problem of politics, not science

Jiang Kejun and Valérie Masson-Delmotte :How will our children and grandchildren, looking back on this period in history, judge our response to climate change, the defining challenge of our time?

Funding, financing smart cities in developing economies

Kishore Rao, Michael Flynn :As is often cited, by 2030, 60 percent of the world will live in cities. The world's population is projected at 8.5 billion people by 2030

How much can the Gulf region rely on Washington?

Arnab Neil Sengupta :The concept of a Middle East Strategic Alliance being explored by the Trump administration, is fine in theory but whether it will work in practice is open