Monday, December 17, 2018 | ePaper

BREAKING NEWS:

For the open-minded

  • Print


Weekend Plus Desk :
Recently, a wellness festival titled Quantum Energy Conclave 2018 was held in Bangalore. It focused on energy-based healing, and threw light on other forms of alternative healing such as sound therapy and crystal therapy. These days, there are quite a few takers for alternative healing, despite many of its positive effects being tagged as being placebo effects. Several celebrities such as Bella Hadid and Kate Hudson endorse alternative healing, which has stirred curiosity about such practices. Herein, experts expound on sound, neurofeedback and crystal therapy.
What is energy-based medicine?
According to a study published in the medical journal Acta Neurochirurgica in 2005, energy-based therapies "expand the healing spectrum of individuals". It goes on to state, "Not only do they have the capability to help a variety of secondary conditions, they have the ability in some people, for certain injuries, to restore function, sometimes dramatically."
SOUND THERAPY
Aurelio, a sound therapist and founder of sound research institute Svaram in Pondicherry, says, "There is vibration in all materials. Even during early gestation, we grow up listening to our mother's heartbeats. But somewhere, we lose our inner and sacred approach to music, and it becomes a purely entertaining product. Parents turn learning music into something competitive."
Aurelio has been learning about sound and its effects since 1981, when he encountered aborigines who used healing rituals, as they were miles and weeks away from any medical help. "If you live in a place where you hear the noise of traffic or construction constantly, it will affect you. Every 'dis'ease is a disharmony. When we reharmonise our system with the help of balancing vibrations, physiological effects follow. It generates the will and capacity to self-heal in a person," he explains.
The therapist says that many people come to him expecting miracle cures or quick fixes, but that's not how it works. "A disease has to be dealt with at its root," he says. "Once, a child was brought to me for his learning disability. But the root of the problem was that there were problems among the parents. All he needed was unconditional love and emotional support. How one considers the disease has changed here."
Aurelio firmly believes that every treatment has its place. "Vaccinations are necessary. Even though the future of medicine is energy-based, the ideal healthcare system will have an integrated therapeutic approach. It will be a centre where allopaths, ayurveds, homeopaths, unani medicine practioners, reiki healers, craniosacral therapists, chiropractors and other specialists all come together to diagnose and then give the best, tailor-made solution for the patient's illness and recovery process."
NEUROFEEDBACK THERAPY
Neurofeedback therapists say that when a frequency is supplied to a person, the brain has the ability to copy that frequency. Using this principle, neurofeedback therapists try to heal their patients.
Michael Beasley, a nuerofeedback therapist, says, "Your brain is the centre that registers pain. Painkillers inhibit you from feeling it. So if the brain waves can be programmed to emulate a healthy person's brain with the help of devices, it can be optimised again, and the pain and anxiety may be lowered." Beasley says that he turned his attention from research in semi-conductors to helping those with chronic pain using pain relief devices when his daughter Julie Nicole Beasley was shot by a gunman in 2001.
Therapists use technologies such as Low Energy Neurofeedback System (LENS) and NeuroField with different functions to treat different ailments. Beasley, a major in chemistry from Western Kentucky University, USA, explains that such devices help calm the brain and bring one to a meditative state. "I have worked with people suffering from anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. My own daughter has had so much relief with her chronic pain and associated traumas with the help of these machines," he says.
Therapists claim that neurofeedback therapy can work really quickly, but that is one of the drawbacks Beasley has had to deal with. "A person who has been suffering from anxiety for several years may be uncomfortable with a sudden change in their mental status within a few minutes. The sudden clarity of thoughts may be too easy or hard to process. They may doublethink their own decision-making process, or may wish to immediately solve a problem, because the path is very clear," he says. Beasley adds that despite no reports of any permanent harm, there are chances of ticks and seizures in this therapy.

More News For this Category

Hot air balloons to fill the London  skyline soon

Hot air balloons to fill the London skyline soon

Weekend Plus Desk :Have you ever seen 50 hot air balloons scattered across the blue sky at the same time, with the exception of Cappadocia in Turkey? London will

From bananas to coffee: Here are some healthy foods that can improve stamina

Weekend Plus Desk :Many-a-times, we may feel run-down at some point during the day when we least expect or want it. This could be just before hitting the gym

Writer Mohammad Yakub Ali Chowdhury

Khondkar Sirajul Haque :Mohammad Yakub Ali Chowdhury  (1888-1940) was a writer and journalist, was born on 18 Kartik 1395 BS (November 1888) in the village of Maguradanga of Pangsha

Venturous Runa to reach the goal

Venturous Runa to reach the goal

Rabiul Alam :Runa Akter is a 3rd year student of Jagannath University English department. She had to pass a life of suffering, heartsore and misery to come to the

The Victory Celebration

-Asad Chowdhury    Rivers, and our poor streams Suddenly get excited all over in a frolicsome manner like that of a maiden; What has happenep? what's the matter? Asks the

Bengali language

Bengali language

Literature Desk :Bengali language is the member of the Indo-Aryan group of the Indo-Iranian branch of the Indo-European language family. It is spoken by more than 270 million people

Folk Poet Abdul Hye Mashreki

Folk Poet Abdul Hye Mashreki

Literature Desk :Abdul Hye Mashreki (1 April 1909 - 4 December 1988) was a renowned Folk Litterateur and Poet in Bangladesh.  In the 30s and 40s he got a

Poet Mahmuda Khatun Siddiqua

Poet Mahmuda Khatun Siddiqua

Mahmud Shah Qureshi :Mahmuda Khatun Siddiqua, (1906-1977) writer, was born in Pabna on 16 December 1906. Her father, Khan Bahadur Mohammad Sulaiman, was an Inspector of Schools, and her

Educationist, litterateur Munier Choudhury

Educationist, litterateur Munier Choudhury

Literature Desk :Munier Choudhury was a famous political dissident, educationist and literary critic. He invented the advanced Bangla typewriter. He frequently visited East Germany to make this new typewriter.

 Decent menstrual hygiene management, SDGs and budget

Decent menstrual hygiene management, SDGs and budget

Mohammad Zobair Hasan :Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) is one of the core issues that need proper policy attention to achieve at least two Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), viz. Healthy