Tuesday, February 20, 2018 | ePaper

There's only one conclusion on the Rohingya in Myanmar: It's genocide

  • Print
CNN :
The Rohingya crisis in Myanmar is now widely described as ethnic cleansing. But the situation has been evolving. And now, it seems, we can no longer avoid the conclusion we have all been dreading. This is a genocide. And we, in the international community, must recognize it as such.
Article II of United Nation's 1948 Genocide Convention describes genocide as "any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such: Killing members of the group; Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group; Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part; Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group; Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group." Though the Rohingya situation has met most of the above criteria for being described as a genocide under international law for a number of years now, the label has been resisted until now because we think of genocide as one huge act of frenzied violence, like the machete insanity in Rwanda or the gas chambers of Nazi Germany. But the final peak of violence is in all historical cases merely the visible tip of the iceberg. And the final outburst only occurs once it has already been rendered unavoidable by the political context.
In Rwanda, Hutu tribal propaganda ran for years on the radio and in magazines referring to the Tutsis as cockroaches and a mortal threat to the Hutus that needed to be eliminated lest the Hutus themselves would die. Kill or be killed. The frenzied killing was not something that just occurred to the Hutus one day in April 1994. It was the logical conclusion of a campaign of dehumanization and paranoia which lasted for years.
The same is true of the Holocaust. The Nazi genocide began slowly and had few distinctive outbursts of violence to delineate where one degree of crime against humanity ended and where another began.
All in all, that genocide developed and unfolded   over a period of more than 10 years. Most of that period was not taken up with the killing of Jews, Gypsies and all the other "sub-humans." Rather, it was taken up with manufacturing of the category of "sub-humans" by state propaganda. Only once the problem was manufactured and sold to the wider population did the "final solution" become viable.
In Myanmar, extremist Buddhist monks have been preaching that the Rohingya are reincarnated from snakes and insects. Killing them would not be a crime against humanity, they say-it would be more like pest control.
And necessary "pest control" too. Just like the Tutsi conspiracy to kill all the Hutus, or the Protocols of the Elders of Zion, the Rohingya are supposed to be agents of a global Islamist conspiracy to take over the world and forcibly instate a global caliphate. The duty of any good Buddhist who wants to maintain the national and religious character of Myanmar is to prevent the Islamist takeover, and thus to help remove the threat posed by the "vermin." Every modern genocide has followed this pattern. Years of concerted dehumanization campaigns are the absolutely necessary pre-condition for the mass murder at the end. Usually these campaigns are led by a repressive government, but other political forces also come into play. Such was the case in Bosnia, Darfur and Rwanda. And so it is with Myanmar. The campaign of dehumanization against the Rohingya has been going on for decades, and events certainly took an unmistakeable turn towards genocide since at least the outbursts of communal violence in 2012. Those clashes, and the ones in the subsequent years, drove 200,000 to 300,000 Rohingya out of Myanmar. But somehow, at that rate of attrition, and against the backdrop of Myanmar's supposed move towards democracy with the election of Aung San Suu Kyi to power in late 2015, world leaders have allowed themselves to hope that the situation could still be turned around.

More News For this Category

Dispose 139 prisoners' cases within Aug: HC

Staff Reporter :The High Court (HC) on Monday ordered to dispose of the cases of 139 prisoners within August 2018 who are now detained in 68 jails of the

Saudi women allowed to start business sans male relative's permission

AFP, Riyadh :Women in Saudi Arabia can now open their own businesses without the consent of a husband or male relative, as the kingdom pushes to expand a fast-growing

Bangladesh steps into 4G era

UNB, Dhaka :Bangladesh has entered an era of digital connectivity as three mobile phone operators rolled out the 4G mobile phone services in the country on Monday night.They launched

Charges over US prove nothing : Russia

MOSCOW (Reuters)  :The Kremlin said on Monday that U.S. charges against 13 Russians and three Russian companies accused of meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election campaign contained zero

Court to decide Khaleda's polls fate: Quader

UNB, Dhaka :Awami League General Secretary Obaidul Quader on Monday said BNP Chairperson Khaleda Zia's participation in the upcoming national election is under the jurisdiction of court."...court will decide

SPBn cop received bullet accidently

Staff Reporter :A constable of Special Security and Protection Battalion (SPBn) sustained bullet injuries from a gun of sub-inspector accidently at the capital's Chandrima Udyan early Monday.The injured was

IS kills 25 Iraqi militiamen near Kirkuk

KIRKUK, Iraq (Reuters)  :Islamic State militants ambushed a convoy of government-backed militia fighters near the northern Iraqi city of Kirkuk late on Sunday, killing at least 25 of them,

3 killed in Cox's Bazar road crash

UNB, Cox's Bazar :Three people were killed and two injured as a private car hit a roadside tree in Teknaf upazila here early Monday.The deceased were identified as Mahbubur

UK brings visa services at much closer to home

UNB, Dhaka :People wishing to apply for a UK visa will now be able to use the On Demand Mobile Visa (ODMV) service which allows applicants who are resident

Over 200 shanties gutted in Ctg fire

UNB, Chittagong :More than 200 shanties were gutted on Monday as a fire broke out at three slums in Miakhanagar area under Bakolia police station in the city.Kamal Uddin