Wednesday, January 24, 2018 | ePaper

Rohingya Muslims being wiped off Myanmar`s map

  • Print
AP :
For generations, Rohingya Muslims have called Myanmar home. Now, in what appears to be a systematic purge, they are, quite literally, being wiped off the map.
After a series of attacks by Muslim militants last month, security forces and allied mobs retaliated by burning down thousands of homes in the enclaves of the predominantly Buddhist nation where the Rohingya live.
That has sent some 417,000 people fleeing to neighboring Bangladesh, according to U.N. estimates. There they have joined tens of thousands of others who have fled over the past year.
And they are still leaving, piling into wooden boats that take them to sprawling, monsoon-drenched refugee camps in Bangladesh. Their plight has been decried as ethnic cleansing by U.N. Secretary General Antonio Guterres, and few believe they will ever be welcomed back to Myanmar.
"This is the worst crisis in Rohingya history," said Chris Lewa, founder of the Arakan Project, which works to improve conditions for the ethnic minority, citing the monumental size and speed of the exodus. "Security forces have been burning villages one by one, in a very systematic way. And it's still ongoing."
Using a network of monitors, Lewa and her agency are meticulously documenting tracts of villages that have been partially or completely burned down in three townships in northern Rakhine state, where the vast majority of Myanmar's 1.1 million Rohingya once lived. It's a painstaking task because there are hundreds of them, and information is almost impossible to verify because the army has blocked access to the area. Satellite imagery released by Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch, limited at times because of heavy cloud coverage, shows massive swaths of scorched landscape.
The Arakan Project has found that almost every tract of villages in Maungdaw township suffered some burning, and that all of Maungdaw has been almost completely abandoned by Rohingya.
Of the 21 Rohingya villages in Rathedaung, to the north, only five were not targeted. Three camps for Rohingya who were displaced in communal riots five years ago also were torched.
Buthidaung, to the east, so far has been largely spared. It is the only township where security operations appear limited to areas where attacks by Rohingya militants, which triggered the ongoing crackdown, occurred.
The Rohingya have had a long and troubled history in Myanmar, where many in the country's 60 million people look on them with disdain.
Though members of the ethnic minority first arrived generations ago, they were stripped of their citizenship in 1982, denying them almost all rights and rendering them stateless. They cannot travel freely, practice their religion, or work as teachers or doctors, and they have little access to medical care, food or education.
The U.N. has labeled the Rohingya one of the world's most persecuted religious minorities.
Still, if it weren't for their safety, many would rather live in Myanmar than be forced to another country that doesn't want them.
"Now we can't even buy plastic to make a shelter," said 32-year-old Kefayet Ullah of the camp in Bangladesh where he and his family are struggling to get from one day to the next.
In Rakhine, they had land for farming and a small shop. Now they have nothing.
"Our heart is crying for our home," he said, tears streaming down his face. "Even the father of my grandfather was born in Myanmar."
This is not the first time the Rohingya have fled en masse.
Hundreds of thousands left in 1978 and again in the early 1990s, fleeing military and government oppression, though policies were later put in place that allowed many to return. Communal violence in 2012, as the country was transitioning from a half-century of dictatorship to democracy, sent another 100,000 fleeing by boat. Some 120,000 remain trapped in camps under apartheid-like conditions outside Rakhine's capital, Sittwe.
But no exodus has been as massive and swift as the one taking place now.
The military crackdown came in retaliation for a series of coordinated attacks by Rohingya militants led by Attaullah Abu Ammar Jununi, who was born in Pakistan and raised in Saudi Arabia.

More News For this Category

Global brand to give $2m for safe workplace

UNB, Dhaka :IndustriALL Global Union and UNI Global Union have reached a $2.3 million settlement with a multinational apparel brand to remedy life-threatening workplace hazards.The brand, which cannot be

Narayanganj City Corporation Mayor Selina Hayat Ivy speaking at a press briefing after her release from the Labaid Hospital on Tuesday.

Narayanganj City Corporation Mayor Selina Hayat Ivy speaking at a press briefing after her release from the Labaid Hospital on Tuesday.

.

Electricity Bill passed keeping punishment provision

BSS, Dhaka :The Jatiya Sangsad here yesterday unanimously passed the "Electricity Bill, 2018" keeping the provision of maximum five years in jail along with Taka 5 lakh financial penalty

Govt's vindictive attitude alarming: Khaleda

UNB, Dhaka :BNP Chairperson Khaleda Zia on Tuesday said the government's vindictive attitude towards its opponents is gradually becoming very dangerous to eliminate the existence of the opposition and

2 ASIs withdrawn over bribery charge in Ashulia

Staff Reporter :Two Assistant Sub-Inspectors (ASIs) of Ashulia Police Station have been withdrawn on the charge of taking bribe from a man at Baroipara in Ashulia of Savar upazila

Two officials sent to jail

Court Correspondent :The Chief Metropolitan Magistrate (CMM) Court of Dhaka on Tuesday sent three persons including two officials of the Education Ministry in the jail on the charges of

2 Edn Ministry officials suspended for taking bribe

2 Edn Ministry officials suspended for taking bribe

Staff Reporter :The Ministry of Education has suspended two of their officials, now in police custody, on the charge of taking bribe over reopening of the controversial Lakehead Grammar

Directive to revive waste bin project

Directive to revive waste bin project

Reza Mahmud :With a view to reviving the 'flopped waste bin project' of Dhaka South and Dhaka North City Corporations, Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina has ordered both the corporations

BNP leader Taimur held

UNB, Narayanganj :Police arrested BNP leader advocate Taimur Alam Khandaker on Tuesday afternoon, outside the district court here in connection with a violence case.Officer-in-Charge of Fatulla Police Station Md

Project to prevent intrusion from Myanmar okayed

UNB, Dhaka :The Executive Committee of National Economic Council (Ecnec) on Tuesday approved a project for improving security along the Bangladesh-Myanmar border in Cox's Bazar and prevent intrusion from