Monday, July 23, 2018 | ePaper

Rohingya Muslims being wiped off Myanmar`s map

  • Print
AP :
For generations, Rohingya Muslims have called Myanmar home. Now, in what appears to be a systematic purge, they are, quite literally, being wiped off the map.
After a series of attacks by Muslim militants last month, security forces and allied mobs retaliated by burning down thousands of homes in the enclaves of the predominantly Buddhist nation where the Rohingya live.
That has sent some 417,000 people fleeing to neighboring Bangladesh, according to U.N. estimates. There they have joined tens of thousands of others who have fled over the past year.
And they are still leaving, piling into wooden boats that take them to sprawling, monsoon-drenched refugee camps in Bangladesh. Their plight has been decried as ethnic cleansing by U.N. Secretary General Antonio Guterres, and few believe they will ever be welcomed back to Myanmar.
"This is the worst crisis in Rohingya history," said Chris Lewa, founder of the Arakan Project, which works to improve conditions for the ethnic minority, citing the monumental size and speed of the exodus. "Security forces have been burning villages one by one, in a very systematic way. And it's still ongoing."
Using a network of monitors, Lewa and her agency are meticulously documenting tracts of villages that have been partially or completely burned down in three townships in northern Rakhine state, where the vast majority of Myanmar's 1.1 million Rohingya once lived. It's a painstaking task because there are hundreds of them, and information is almost impossible to verify because the army has blocked access to the area. Satellite imagery released by Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch, limited at times because of heavy cloud coverage, shows massive swaths of scorched landscape.
The Arakan Project has found that almost every tract of villages in Maungdaw township suffered some burning, and that all of Maungdaw has been almost completely abandoned by Rohingya.
Of the 21 Rohingya villages in Rathedaung, to the north, only five were not targeted. Three camps for Rohingya who were displaced in communal riots five years ago also were torched.
Buthidaung, to the east, so far has been largely spared. It is the only township where security operations appear limited to areas where attacks by Rohingya militants, which triggered the ongoing crackdown, occurred.
The Rohingya have had a long and troubled history in Myanmar, where many in the country's 60 million people look on them with disdain.
Though members of the ethnic minority first arrived generations ago, they were stripped of their citizenship in 1982, denying them almost all rights and rendering them stateless. They cannot travel freely, practice their religion, or work as teachers or doctors, and they have little access to medical care, food or education.
The U.N. has labeled the Rohingya one of the world's most persecuted religious minorities.
Still, if it weren't for their safety, many would rather live in Myanmar than be forced to another country that doesn't want them.
"Now we can't even buy plastic to make a shelter," said 32-year-old Kefayet Ullah of the camp in Bangladesh where he and his family are struggling to get from one day to the next.
In Rakhine, they had land for farming and a small shop. Now they have nothing.
"Our heart is crying for our home," he said, tears streaming down his face. "Even the father of my grandfather was born in Myanmar."
This is not the first time the Rohingya have fled en masse.
Hundreds of thousands left in 1978 and again in the early 1990s, fleeing military and government oppression, though policies were later put in place that allowed many to return. Communal violence in 2012, as the country was transitioning from a half-century of dictatorship to democracy, sent another 100,000 fleeing by boat. Some 120,000 remain trapped in camps under apartheid-like conditions outside Rakhine's capital, Sittwe.
But no exodus has been as massive and swift as the one taking place now.
The military crackdown came in retaliation for a series of coordinated attacks by Rohingya militants led by Attaullah Abu Ammar Jununi, who was born in Pakistan and raised in Saudi Arabia.

More News For this Category

Extortion in cattle-laden trucks to be stopped : Asad

Staff Reporter :Home Minister Asaduzzaman Khan Kamal  on sunday said that extortion from sacrificial cattle-laden trucks must be stopped ahead of Eid-ul-Azha.The Minister directed all to take action in

The people of city's Mirhajir bagh area brought out a procession demanding smooth supply of drinking water and later submitted a memorandum to the respective authority on Sunday.

The people of city's Mirhajir bagh area brought out a procession demanding smooth supply of drinking water and later submitted a memorandum to the respective authority on Sunday.

.

Trump aide's 'Russia ties' alleged in secret US documents

AFP :The FBI believed that a former Trump campaign advisor had ties to Russia as it sought to influence the 2016 US presidential election, top secret documents released to

Bomb blast near Kabul airport leaves 10 dead

Al Jazeera News :An explosion has killed or wounded at least 10 people near Kabul's international airport shortly after Afghan Vice President Rashid Dostum returned to the country after

Two found dead in Gaibandha

UNB, Gaibandha :Police recovered the bodies of a man and an auto-rickshaw driver from Sadullapur and Polashbari upazila on Sunday morning.Borhan Uddin, officer-in-charge of Sadullapur Police Station, said locals

'Arms factory' busted in Cox's Bazar: 2 held

UNB, Cox's Bazar :Rapid Action Battalion (RAB) in an overnight drive unearthed an arms making factory in Kolmarchhari area of Maheshkhali upazila on Saturday night.The elite force members also

ISPR asks SC to look into 'serious allegations against state institutions' by Justice Siddiqui

Dawn.com  :The Inter-Services Public Relations (ISPR), via Twitter on Sunday, requested the Supreme Court of Pakistan to "initiate appropriate process to ascertain the veracity of the allegations" made by

FFs to receive free healthcare from govt hospitals

UNB, Dhaka :A Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) was signed between the Ministry of Liberation War Affairs and the Health Service Division under the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare

Treasure search stopped as building collapse apprehended

UNB, Dhaka :The excavation work that started on Saturday in search of 'hidden treasure' at a house of Mirpur-10 in the capital was postponed on Sunday to avert the

BAU stage for founding anniv celebration gutted

UNB, Mymensingh :A fire gutted the stage built for the celebration of the 57th founding anniversary of Bangladesh Agricultural University (BAU) on Saturday night.President Abdul Hamid is scheduled to