Friday, November 24, 2017 | ePaper

Towards a pollution free Asia-Pacific zone

  • Print
Shamshad Akhtar and Erik Solheim  :
Senior government officials from across Asia and the Pacific will meet in Bangkok this week for the first-ever Asia-Pacific Ministerial Summit on the Environment. The high-level meeting is co-convened by the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (UN ESCAP) and UN Environment and is a unique opportunity for the region's environment leaders to discuss how they can work together towards a resource efficient and pollution-free Asia-Pacific.
At the core of the meeting is the question: how can we use our resources more efficiently to continue to grow our economies in a manner that does not tax our natural environment or generate pollution affecting public health and ecosystem health. There is certainly much room for improvement to make in this area.
Resources such as fossil fuels, biomass, metals and minerals are essential to build economies. However, the region's resource efficiency has regressed in recent years. Asia is unfortunately the least resource efficient region in the world. In 2015, we used one third more materials to produce each unit of GDP than in 1990. Developing countries use five times as many resources per dollar of GDP in comparison to rest of the world and10 times more than industrialized countries in the region. This inefficiency of resource use results into wastage and pollution further affecting the natural resources and public health which are the basic elements for ensuring sustainable economic growth.
As the speed and scale of economic growth continues to accelerate across the region, pollution has become a critical area for action. While the challenge of pollution is a global one, the impacts are overwhelmingly felt in developing countries. About 95 per cent of adults and children who are impacted by pollution-related illnesses live in low and middle-income countries. Asia and the Pacific produces more chemicals and waste than any other region in the world and accounts for the bulk - 25 out of 30 - of cities with highest levels of PM 2.5, the tiny atmospheric particulate matter that can cause respiratory and cardiovascular diseases and cancer. More than 80 per cent of our rivers are heavily polluted while five of the top land-based ocean plastic sources are from countries in our region. Estimates put the cost of marine pollution to regional economies at a staggering US$1.3 billion.
If left unattended, these trends threaten to up end hard-won economic gains and hamper human development. But while these challenges appear intractable, the region has tremendous strengths and opportunities to draw from. Many countries hold solid track records of successful economic transformation. The capacity for promoting environmental sustainability as an integral pillar of sustainable development must now be developed across all countries in the region
There are some profound changes underway in Asia and the Pacific. The region is experiencing the largest rural to urban migration in history. Developing these new urban areas with resource-efficient buildings, waste water and solid waste management systems can do much to advance this agenda. Advancing the "sharing economy" might mean we have better utilization of assets such as vehicles, houses or other assets, greatly reducing material inputs and pollution. The widespread move to renewable energy should rein in fossil fuel use. And advances in recycling, materials technology, 3D printing and manufacturing could also support greater resource circularity.
Moving to green technologies and eco innovation offer economic and employment opportunities. Renewable energy provided jobs for 9.8 million people worldwide in 2016. Waste can be converted into economic opportunities, including jobs. In Cebu City- the second-largest city in the Philippines, concerted Solid Waste Management has borne fruit: waste has been reduced by 30 per cent in 2012; treatment of organic waste in neigbourhoods has led to lower transportation costs and longer use period in landfills. The poor have largely benefited from hundreds of jobs that have been created.
We need to move to a more resource efficient and pollution free growth path that supports and promotes healthy environments. The cost of inaction for managing resources efficiently and preventing pollution is too high and a threat to economies, livelihoods and health across the region.
(Shamshad Akhtar, is Executive Secretary of the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) and Erik Solheim, is Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).

More News For this Category

Save Hatirjheel from waste disposal

THE Hatirjheel Project built to be a beautiful lake in the city center, besides working as a water reservoir and new traffic lanes around it has lost most of

School students need be spared from party politics

APPARENTLY not content with being confined to public universities and colleges, Bangladesh Chhatra League, the student front of ruling party Awami League now moves to form committees at secondary

Controlling plastic pollution

Jocelyn Blériot :Offensive pictures of plastic pollution have made the headlines in an unprecedented way over the course of 2017, and this year's edition of the Our Ocean conference, hosted

China's path to climate leadership

Manish Bapna, Lailai Li  :As international climate talks in Bonn wrap up, it's important to realize just how much the world has been whipsawed in less than two years. In

Of income inequality

Varsha S. Kulkarni and Raghav Gaiha :Have demonetisation and the GST aggravated income inequality?With the Gujarat State elections barely a few weeks away, the debate on the Indian economy has

Readers’ Forum

Commercial coffee farmingA number of entrepreneurs have successfully tried their luck at cultivating coffee in Madhupur and Chittagong Hill Tracts. According to multiple media reports, they increased their investment to

Banks keep bleeding with bad debts for mismanagement

Over Tk 18,135 crore of loans have become defaulted in the banking sector in the last nine months of 2017 as the trend continued in the third quarter (July-September).

Forces Mugabe relied on threw him out

ZIMBABWE'S President Robert Mugabe resigned on Tuesday ending his 37-year rule of the African nation as independence leader from British colonial rule in 1980. He started as a hero

The poor will judge effectiveness of climate change actions

Fekitamoeloa Katoa 'Utoikamanu :Two years ago, 197 parties came together in Paris and agreed to the historical Paris Framework. Since that December 2015, we all have seen countless pictures of

Give teens room to take risks and grow

Dan Romer :Much of the risk behaviour attributed to adolescents is not the result of an out-of-control brain. A deficit in the development of the teenage brain has been blamed