Tuesday, January 23, 2018 | ePaper

London acid attacks most unexpected in British society

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HAVING experienced terror strikes and bomb attacks in recent times, London is reeling now from a spree of acid attacks. Five separate incidents of acid attacks took place in less than two hours on last Thursday night. Unfortunately, the victims are from Asian Community and mainly Muslims in the streets and restaurants in East and North London where most Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi nationals live.

It appears that racial hate mongers and ultra-nationalist elements are out to carry acid attacks on innocent people hitting hard at the very core of the traditional British value distinct by its racial tolerance and social harmony. Unlike in any Asian and African country where criminals carry out such abhorrent attacks, racist white skin criminals in the West too have developed their own form of acid attacks and other methods of doing harm on migrant community -- be it in the streets of London or Los Angeles.

Two male suspects carried out the latest London acid attack on some people in the London streets and police investigating on the attack charged a 16-year boy for involvement with four others. Such attacks are most unusual and unexpected in British society.

Early this week, a Muslim girl had her face severely burnt from acid attack, though narrowly survived. Manager of a restaurant was severely hit in an acid attack on his eyes but escaped bigger injuries. One member of Bangladesh Cricket team now on visit to England also reportedly felt insecure from suspected criminals while returning with his wife and son from a restaurant at night. Terribly panicked he left London the next day.

We know British people believe in social harmony and the authorities will be firm to save the country from such scourge.


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