Monday, January 22, 2018 | ePaper

Chikunguniya continues to cheat our City Mayors

  • Print
THIS year's outbreak of Chikunguniya fever a couple of months ago in the capital and other places around the country has been one unprecedented endemic. Caused by mosquito bites the symptoms of this fever includes headache, fever and joint pain - much like dengue fever - and infected persons usually recover, although the post-recovery impacts linger for weeks and months. Never before so many citizens of Dhaka was inflicted by such a painfully enduring health disease in the recent past. At least one from almost all families somehow caught and had to suffer from it. Rather apprehensively it has not stopped as yet, though the number of the fever's victims has reduced. However, it is now moving to the rural side.
    
What surprises us, however, except a few sporadic TV and Newspaper campaigns in a few selective places there is still no sense of urgency on preventing this viral disease among the concerned authorities. Though the fever has been identified as non-fatal but that doesn't leave any room for not taking preventive measures. So far a total of 23 areas in Dhaka city has recently been identified as most risky for spreading Chikunguniya disease. Apart from removing the threats from the selected areas we expect the two Municipal City Corporations to spread all forms of awareness campaigns to prevent its frequency. 

Currently, there is no commercial vaccine for it. However, researchers have reportedly developed the first vaccine for this fever. It is not any time soon that the vaccine will become easily accessible in Bangladesh. In terms of taking medication the doctors' suggest that there isn't much to do except taking commonly used life-saving drugs and ample amount of rest. But what we should collectively do is to ensure that our houses and localities are not any how breeding grounds of the mosquitoes containing the Chikunguniya virus.

That said - breeding grounds for the Chikunguniya mosquitoes were being prepared from the onset of pre-monsoon rainfall. Indiscriminate deposits of water here and there had caused fast breeding, and now at the peak of the monsoon it is recurring again. Of course we don't expect the North Dhaka City Mayor to go inside every house for hanging mosquito nets - which he has reportedly said not possible for him - no City Mayor is expected to do so either, but he can surely execute his duties by disinfecting and keeping drains, ditches and pits clean. Not to forget lying on relatively low lands with huge lakes and more greenery it is his part of Dhaka which is more prone for breeding mosquitoes. Also more than just initiating the cleaning methods it is more important to monitor the progress round the clock. It is right there where the weaknesses for tackling the Chikunguniya menace have become visible. The Health Ministry has, perhaps, rightly put the burden on the 2 Mayors' shoulders for their utter failure to face the situation.   The relentless countrywide campaigning for informing and warning the public is missing too. 

Evidently, it will take active surveillance and close collaboration with Local Administrations to eliminate the hotspots. Mobilising the community to participate in sanitation campaigns holds the key, although families that live in deprived neighbourhoods will need generous municipal assistance, improved civic facilities and access to free health care. It's time the City Corporations focuses on these unaddressed issues.


More News For this Category

Death for noisy celebrations is unfortunate: Police to be vigilant

WE know music is an art form and cultural activity. It is also an important part of people's way of life, as it plays a key role in religious

Migrant workers` early death should worry our govt

A NATIONAL daily reported that at least 3,480 Bangladeshi workers died abroad in 2017, mostly due to stroke or heart attack. Unbearable physical and mental stress, workload, malnutrition, ill

Avoiding common traps in energy savings

Tom Machinchick and Dr. Andreas Hermelink :The savings related to energy conservation measures (ECMs) always come from a comparison of what would have been the consumption without ECMs and what

Aid groups confront an invisible danger

Kelli Rogers :The arrival of more than 655,000 vulnerable Rohingya refugees to Bangladesh in a four-month span has created a chaotic window of opportunity for those who seek to exploit

Threat to sustainable development

Roger Day :In laying out the Sustainable Development Goals, the international community set itself an ambitious set of targets to achieve by the end of the next decade. But the

Readers’ Forum

End food adulterationAs the economy moves ahead, Bangladeshi people, in general, are now consuming more meat, fruits and vegetables than ever. With the increased consumption, concerns about food safety have

Save heritage sites from land grabbers

HERITAGE sites in the capital and elsewhere in Bangladesh are in the danger of disappearance. The authorities' apathy has been blamed by archaeologist, architects and urban planners for the

Repatriation will be useless if Myanmar not considers Rohingya as citizens

DHAKA and Naypyidaw both are now making final preparations to repatriate and receive the first batch of Rohingya Muslims despite protest from different quarters for not ensuring their security

Would PPPs undermine public health development ?

Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame Sundaram :The United Nations Agenda 2030 for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is being touted in financial circles as offering huge investment opportunities requiring trillions

New Year and prosperous Bangladesh

Masudul Hasan :Another New Year '2018' has appeared among us with many dreams and possibilities. With the arrival of the New Year, it is our expectation that lives of all