Tuesday, January 16, 2018 | ePaper

Monsoon rain fashion

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Sheikh Arif Bulbon :
The rain must be too daunting in the hot day to force you adapt with this warm environment. Time is going by, things are moving forward and so should your style.
Looking like you did a few years ago is boring and doesn’t inspire the kind of excitement that will draw good things your way.
No matter your budget or how much time you have to spare, following these warm day style tips (all or just some of them) will go a long way in updating your look after Eid.
Hair, body & skin cares
Warm weather means exposing more skin and more body hair.
A lot of guys have excess body hair that needs to be groomed. Some body parts, like your back, are not negotiable -- get it waxed. (Tip: Make sure there is no hair between your back and the line where your hair on your head begins. Unruly hairs creeping out from the back of your T-shirt is a turnoff.) Think about a punjabi which exposes your back hair or chest hair while you would be socializing- it can turn down your fashion.
Get a haircut every three weeks
Ask a woman what she notices about a man, and hair, without fail, will be mentioned. How you wear your hair in the summer is arguably the most important time of the year to care, because it goes a long way in separating us from the rest of the T-shirt-and-shorts-wearing crowd. If you are planning for a cool hair cut downloaded from online--a more of a football star's one--cut your hair at least 3 days before the Eid day so that it does not give the freshly cut hair look. Make sure you have booked up ahead the busy schedule of your barber.
Colours and accessories
Monsoon fashion for men can get boring. Unlike women, who can wear dresses, skirts, high heels, etc, men are relegated to shorts and T-shirts. The answer to this challenge lies in accessories.
A handkerchief worn as a pocket square, a vintage leather backpack -- these are accessories that give basic outfits more character.
And by colour, we don't mean a lighter version of your blue jeans. Show of hands: How many of you only wear black, blue, white and gray? How boring. Dark colors look jarring under the sun, so this season, don't be afraid of injecting your wardrobe with some much-needed color. A pair of chinos, a button-down, a wallet, sneakers -- they all work as colorful alternatives to the usual rotation.  Make sure you have a perfect match while wearing punjabi with your sandal- remember color is the trick in the summer.
Protect your skin
You know you are supposed to wear sunscreen year round, right? And how many of you do? That has to change, because you don't want to put your health at risk and you don't want to speed up the aging process.
Look for a lightweight moisturizer. Some also come with a built-in self-tanner, which will give you that awesome tan.
Think one cologne is enough? Think again. As the seasons change, so should your scent. Citrus-y scents work best in warm weather, while spicy and woodsy notes are best for fall.
Stick with bases and start wearing patterns
Superman, Avengers -- these are all familiar words we’ve seen on, yikes, T-shirts. While T-shirts have become a form of self-expression, we prefer a simple white tee for summer.
Start wearing patterns
Have you been shopping lately? Take note of all of the patterns that are on offer this season: camo, cheetah, tribal, gingham and more. It’s exciting, and you should have fun with it.
Of course, there’s a lot of room for error, so we advise choosing one piece and keeping everything solid. And if you're fashion-forward, you can mix patterns. You can always keep that in mind during buying your punjabi-pajama.
Wearing a cat-eye glasses and a loafer
A nerd look with the common cat-eye glasses can be a good choice with punjabi. You can also find shades that would complement your style. Remember you can save your eyes and at the same time show your fashion sense to the rest of the world.

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