Sunday, May 27, 2018 | ePaper

Human vision keeps developing until mid-life

  • Print
Life Desk :
Human brain's vision-processing centre, that was previously thought to mature and stabilise in the first few years of life, actually continues to develop up to late 30s or early 40s, a new study has found.
Researchers at McMaster University in Canada used brain-tissue samples from 30 people ranging in age from 20 days to 80 years.
Their analysis of proteins that drive the actions of neurons in the visual cortex, or vision-processing centre, at the back of the brain recasts previous understanding of when that part of the brain reaches maturity, extending the time-line until about age 36, plus or minus 4.5 years.
The finding came as a surprise to researchers, who had expected to find that the cortex reached its mature stage by five to six years, consistent with previous results from animal samples and with prevailing scientific and medical belief.
"There's a big gap in our understanding of how our brains function," said Professor Kathryn Murphy, who led the study."
"Our idea of sensory areas developing in childhood and then being static is part of the challenge. It is not correct," said Murphy.
She said that treatment for conditions such as amblyopia or "lazy eye," have been based on the idea that only children could benefit from corrective therapies, since it was thought that treating young adults would be pointless because they had passed the age when their brains could respond.
Though the research is isolated to the visual cortex, it suggests that other areas of the brain may also be much more plastic for much longer than previously thought, Murphy said.
The research was published in The Journal of Neuroscience.

More News For this Category

Access to quality health care

Dr. Samir Kumar Saha  :(From previous issue)The gap between what the government has assessed  (sanctioned) as requirement for providing  healthcare services and the positions vacant clearly shows that Bangladesh

Super foods to keep you hydrated this summer

Super foods to keep you hydrated this summer

Life Desk :Eat when you are hungry and drink when you are thirsty. Sounds quite simple right? Easier said than done. With soaring temperatures and increased humidity levels, your

Musical and bilingual knowledge can improve brain function

Musical and bilingual knowledge can improve brain function

Life Desk  :Learning music or speaking another language can train your brain to be more efficient Musicians and bilinguals (people who can speak two languages) have better working memory

Jewellery to buy for daughters

Jewellery to buy for daughters

Life Desk :Few ideas to buy jewelries:· Material: Daughters and brides of this age have ditched the old jewellery trend of buying gold. They prefer more of silver lining

Suffocating oceans creating dead zones

Suffocating oceans creating dead zones

Life Desk :Our seas and oceans are gasping for breath with very little oxygen in huge pockets of water.A new study by University of East Anglia researchers confirms the

For an ideal kitchen

For an ideal kitchen

Life Desk :The kitchen is undeniably one of the most important rooms in a home as it is the area where the family congregates, meals are prepared, and guests

Access to quality healthcare

Dr. Samir Kumar Saha  :(From previous issue)The gap between what the government has assessed  (sanctioned) as requirement for providing  healthcare services and the positions vacant clearly shows that Bangladesh

Make healthcare affordable for all

Sania Nishtar  :Half of the planet cannot access essential health services. For many people, paying to see a doctor, obtaining medications, seeking family-planning advice, or even getting immunized against

Calculated risks in life

Jay L. Zagorsky :Risk is everywhere and associated with everything. For example, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention a decade ago estimated over 20 million people a year

Int'l edn confce ends

Int'l edn confce ends

A three-day international education conference ended in Canada on Saturday. Al Amin and Bapan Saha, two officials of SA Associates, a renowned education and immigration consulting firm, attended the