Tuesday, October 24, 2017 | ePaper

Power nap can boost employees' creativity

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Life Desk :
A new study says that 20 minutes nap in the afternoon can boost employees' creativity and problem-solving ability, reports Telegraph.co.uk. According to scientists from the University of Leeds in England, this nap could reduce the risks of diabetes, heart problems and depression, which are more likely when you do not get enough sleep.
"The loss of an hour in bed is particularly detrimental to individuals that already struggle with their sleep," said lead study author Nerina Ramlakhan.
Adding, "If you are one of the 25 percent of the nation that gets less than five hours' sleep a night, this time change could see you drop down to as little as four hours, which is a dangerously low amount."
Bosses should consider allowing staff to take a short nap in the office. It can make a huge difference, suggests researchers, reports the Independent.
The findings indicated that napping between 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. for just, twenty minutes nap can make a huge difference.
Naps have been scientifically proven to boost creativity and problem-solving ability and they can even rebalance the immune system, meaning staffs are less likely to take sick days.
"Allowing staff to indulge in a nap during the working day might sound unusual, but considering the country will be losing an hour of sleep over the weekend it's a fair request," Dr Ramlakhan stated.
-ANI

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