Saturday, April 21, 2018 | ePaper

How to survive an enduring career

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Alyssa Walker :
It's like riding on a subway without holding onto anything for balance: the consistent shifting and evolution of your place and space on the train mirrors the metamorphosis of today's work landscape.  One consistent trend in workplace evolution?  Time.  Young graduates will have to work longer than their parents.  Sure, you want to survive.  But we know that you want to do more than that.  You want to thrive.   Here's how.
1. Changing Life Cycles
According to a recent Financial Times article, life used to be measured in three stages: education, work, and retirement, all with fairly equal amounts of time.  That cycle looks different now, with a significantly longer working life.  While an MBA used to be the catalyst for the job that would get you to your final burst of highly successful employment, it's now somewhere in the middle.  When your working life begins in your 20s, you need to begin to think of this cycle lasting for fifty-or even sixty-years.  How should you prepare?  What do you want it to look like?  Consider what it would take to sustain your spending habits-and extrapolate those costs over the next half-century plus.
2. Transition and Change
Recognize that transitions-even positive ones-are always difficult.  They rattle your sense of self, and often your sense of place. They are always a time for growth, whether you want it or not.  The keys to your success? Flexibility and adaptability.  It's unlikely that you'll have the same job for 50 or 60 years. Keep your networks broad and varied-reach out to people of different ages, genders, and occupations.  As you build your portfolio, consider the trends that potential employers will invariably seek-and see.  With perseverance, your career portfolio will tell your story of resilience-and a willingness to try new things.
3. A Few Paces Ahead
Plan your career like you're a chess master: think strategic steps.  Always.  Sitting still gets you nowhere.  Learn a new skill.  Try a new language.  Add some people to that fantastic network of yours (see #2).  Learn some new technology.  Reach out.  Look out.  Do what you enjoy.  Keep yourself relevant, happy, and think about how you can apply what you know and love to what you want to do-recognize that those things will probably change over time.
4. Identify and Invest in…
Your interests and skills.  Easier said than done.  Why?  You need to know what interests you-without having someone else tell you.  When you're just starting out, this can be difficult because there are so many people-family members, friends, professors, career advisors-telling you what you should do.  The key is for you to tell yourself what you should do-and then invest the time in learning how to achieve your goals.  Don't wait for a professional development opportunity to land in your lap.  Make your own.  You'll be thankful you did.
5. Career as Financial Asset
Your career has the potential to pay off dividends bigger than all of your other financial assets combined-car, house, stock portfolio, 401K.  Manage your career like it's gold-because it is.  When you maximize the opportunities for your career, you maximize your financial security-and also your lifestyle satisfaction.  Do what moves you, and figure out a way to maximize your returns.  Find a reliable mentor, assess your risks, survey the economic landscape-and most importantly, establish your classy reputation in whatever path you choose.  You won't regret it.

(Alyssa Walker is a freelance writer, educator, and nonprofit consultant. She lives in the White Mountains of New Hampshire with her family).

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